Data to Keep in Mind

 
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Older People Are Much More Likely To Be Among the Top-spending Percentiles for Healthcare

“The elderly (age 65 and over) made up around 13 percent of the U.S. population in 2002, but they consumed 36 percent of total U.S. personal health care expenses. The average health care expense in 2002 was $11,089 per year for elderly people but only $3,352 per year for working-age people (ages 19-64).”

Reported in “The High Concentration of U.S. Health Care Expenditures,” Agency for Healthcare Reserach and Quality, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/ria19/expendria.htm#ref5, accessed 2/24/13. From Keehan SP, Lazenby HC, Zezza MA, et al. Age Estimates in the National Health Accounts. Health Care Financing Review 2004 Dec. 2; 1(1); Web Exclusive.

Prevalence of Chronic Conditions

Forty-five percent of people aged 65 or older have two or more of nine selected chronic conditions. Conditions included in the survey were: hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, stroke, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, current asthma, and kidney disease.

CDC/NCHS, National Health Interview Survey. As reported in NCHS Data Brief, Number 100, July 2012. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db100.htm.

Obesity in People Age 65 and Older

In 2011, 40.3 percent of women age 65–74 were obese and 41.5 percent of men were obese. That compares with 27 percent of women and 24 percent of men in 1988–1994.

“Older Americans 2012: Key Indicators of Well-Being,”The Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. Health, United States, 2011. CDC and National Center for Health Statistics.

Use of Leisure Time

“Watching TV was the activity that occupied the most leisure activity time—more than one-half of the total—for Americans age 55 and over.” 56–58% of time.

“Older Americans 2012: Key Indicators of Well-Being,”The Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. p. 67.

 

 

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